UJ in Ancient City

Yesterday, I visited The Ancient City at Samut Prakan province. This is my second-time visit here. Also for the first time, I tried Thai traditional dress.

Ancient City is one of the world’s largest outdoor museums features a 200-acre city with 109 scaled-down copies of Thailand’s most famous monuments and architectural attractions. Knowing history is always a good experience.

A visit to the Ancient City is comparable to a Thailand-round journey within a day. Can see every historic place. There are also some original creations that you will only find here. Muang Boran, it’s a little Thailand, a little Laos, Cambodia, China, and Myanmar in one place.

The Sanphet Prasat Palace was the principal palace in the early Ayutthaya period. It was initially built in the reign of King Baromatrai Lokanat, the eighth king of Ayutthaya. 

 The Ancient City creates kind of atmosphere that induces visitors to perceive and appreciate the continuity of history, cultures, religions, arts and customs of Thai people from then until now.

Haw Phra Kaew

Haw Phra Kaew also written as Ho Prakeo, Hor Pha Keo and other similar spellings, is a former temple in Vientiane, Laos.

Chinese and Thai mixed architecture buildings during the Ayutthaya period.

Haw Phra Kaew
Haw Phra Kaew
Great Vajradhamma Temple

The Great Hall of Vajradhamma. In ancient Thai belief, our soul travel from the pagoda which represents our birth year, and once in our life, if we have the chance to travel to the pagoda to make a wish. After our death, our soul will leave the present world and will be returned to the same place we came from.

Great Vajradhamma Temple
In the early Rattanakosin era, the Dusit Maha Prasat Palace
The Chom Thong Palace Hall is one of the palace halls that lies within the grounds of Wat Phra Si Sanphet.
The Fruit Shape Tower – architecture style was popular during the Pre-Ayutthaya periods, namely U-Thong and Ayothaya.

That white horse is real. hehe At that time, Some people were filming. I heard the movie name is Khun Phaen. Good location for the historic movie.

Khun Chang-Khun Phaen Garden

Khun Chang Khun Phaen is a long Thai epic poem which originated from a legend of Thai folklore and is one of the most notable works in Thai literature.

Khun Phaen House – The Ayutthaya style house at Ancient Siam
The Ramayana Garden

Ramayana or the Tale of Rama is an ancient Indian epic telling the story of the migration of the Arayan people into the Gangetic Plain of northern India. A hermit, named Valmiki, who composed the epic in Sanskrit verse. The epic is called, Ramayana.

Travel to past at The Old Market Town
The Garden of Sacred Stupa

The Garden of Sacred Stupa at Muang Boran is formed by a large group of chedi in various architectural styles, built in different periods from the past to present.

The Garden of Sacred Stupa
The Garden of Sacred Stupa

Ancient City is combined with Erawan Museum. I’ve written a post about Erawan Museum . You can check.

Hope you like my post. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Stay safe and take care!

4 thoughts on “UJ in Ancient City

  1. Ancient Indian Cities reveal facts about the different civilisations of the country. The mode of daily life, customs, cultures, celebrations, festivals, religious observances, caste system, sports activities, education and position of women, architecture or any other possible facet of the past can be studied through the ancient Indian cities. Indeed, it can also be comprehended that most of the contemporary Indian cultural refinement has been heavily borrowed and inspired form these ancient Indian cities. The Indus valley Civilisation, with their huge cultural wonders, was primarily based upon the cities of Harappa and Mohenjodaro. Ancient cities in India are known for their distinctive cultural ethos, with the populace known to have been much civilized and for their well structured societies.
    https://www.indianetzone.com/4/ancient_indian_cities.htm

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s